Shingles vaccine safely prevents outbreaks among stem cell transplant patients

Shingles vaccine safely prevents outbreaks among stem cell transplant patients

A newer form of shingles vaccine reduced outbreaks of the painful rash among patients who were transplanted with their own stem cells, according to a study led by a Duke Health researcher and published today in JAMA.The vaccine appears to offer protection from one of the most common and painful side effects of cell therapy and shows promise for patients with immune-compromising conditions.

Antibiotics weaken flu defenses in the lung

Antibiotics weaken flu defenses in the lung

Antibiotics can leave the lung vulnerable to flu viruses, leading to significantly worse infections and symptoms, finds a new study in mice led by the Francis Crick Institute.

Deadly tick-borne virus cured with experimental flu drug, in mice

Deadly tick-borne virus cured with experimental flu drug, in mice

"Without the flu drug, 100 percent of the infected mice died, and with the treatment, 100 percent survived," said Jacco Boon, PhD, an assistant professor of medicine and the paper's senior author.

Are American Zika strains more virulent than Pacific and Asian strains?

Are American Zika strains more virulent than Pacific and Asian strains?

Now, researchers comparing American, Pacific and Southeast Asian subtypes of the virus in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have concluded that the American-subtype strain has the highest ability to grow both in vitro and in vivo.

Stalk antibodies provide flu protection in humans

Stalk antibodies provide flu protection in humans

Co-author Florian Krammer, professor of microbiology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai where the analysis of the data took place, said the study shows that antibodies that target the conserved stalk can provide protection from natural infection with H1N1 virus.

Spanish flu may have lingered two years before 1918 outbreak and vaccine could have treated it

Spanish flu may have lingered two years before 1918 outbreak and vaccine could have treated it

Published in Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics, the study uses modern day scientific technology and delves through literature published in The Lancet from the time, to not only track the origins of the virus, but to seek how we can use this information to learn from the past to prevent the spread of an influenza pandemic.

Early dengue virus infection could 'defuse' zika virus

Early dengue virus infection could 'defuse' zika virus

"We now know for sure that Zika virus infection during pregnancy can affect the unborn fetus in such a way that the child develops microcephaly and other severe symptoms," explains Prof Felix Drexler, a virologist at the Charité who has been developing diagnostic tests for Zika and other viruses at the DZIF.

Antibody responses vs. Ebola keep evolving in survivors, months after recovery

Antibody responses vs. Ebola keep evolving in survivors, months after recovery

Antiviral antibodies produced by survivors of Ebola infection continue to evolve and improve after recovery, according to a detailed study of the immune responses of four people who received care at Emory University Hospital in 2014.In particular, high levels of neutralizing antibodies- thought to be key to protecting someone against deadly infection -- didn't appear in patients' blood until months after they left the hospital.

Human antibody reveals hidden vulnerability in influenza virus

Human antibody reveals hidden vulnerability in influenza virus

In mouse studies, FluA-20 prevented infection or illness when the animals were exposed to four different influenza A viral subtypes that cause disease in humans.

How the dengue virus replicates in infected cells

How the dengue virus replicates in infected cells

The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of the dengue virus interacts with another viral protein called NS4A-2K-4B to enable viral replication, according to a study published May 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Ralf Bartenschlager of the University of Heidelberg, and colleagues.

How Nipah virus spreads from person to person: Lessons from 14 years of investigations

How Nipah virus spreads from person to person: Lessons from 14 years of investigations

The deadly Nipah virus, which is carried by bats and occasionally infects people, is more likely to be transmitted from person to person when the infected patient is older, male and/or has breathing difficulties, according to a study co-led by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Groundbreaking study could lead to fast, simple test for Ebola virus

Groundbreaking study could lead to fast, simple test for Ebola virus

In a breakthrough that could lead to a simple and inexpensive test for Ebola virus disease, researchers have generated two antibodies to the deadly virus. The antibodies, which are inexpensive to produce, potentially could be used in a simple filter paper test to detect Ebola virus and the related Marburg virus.

Drug candidate for reversing mucosal barrier damage by HIV

Drug candidate for reversing mucosal barrier damage by HIV

Investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital led by Raina Fichorova, MD, PhD, in collaboration with an international team, tested a laboratory-made version of a naturally occurring protein (recombinant fragment of human Surfactant Protein D or rfhSP-D) on bioengineered vaginal tissues, immune cells and microbes to determine if the drug candidate could help prevent HIV transmission safely.

Fifteen years of mosquito data implicate species most likely to transmit West Nile virus in Iowa

Fifteen years of mosquito data implicate species most likely to transmit West Nile virus in Iowa

These findings correlate with human cases of West Nile virus, which also occur at higher rates in western Iowa than in other parts of the state, said Ryan Smith, assistant professor of entomology and director of the medical entomology laboratory.

H3N2 viruses mutate during vaccine production but new tech could fix it

H3N2 viruses mutate during vaccine production but new tech could fix it

But H3N2 is different: "H3N2 viruses -- the most important human viruses among the four strains circulating -- do not grow well in eggs or even in MDCK cells, which are most commonly used for influenza virus propagation," says Kawaoka.

Researchers verify new method of HIV transmission among injection drug users and effective prevention technique

Researchers verify new method of HIV transmission among injection drug users and effective prevention technique

New studies from Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University have found for the first time that HIV can be transmitted through the sharing of equipment used to prepare drugs before injection and that a simple intervention -- heating the equipment with a cigarette lighter for 10 seconds -- can destroy the HIV virus, preventing that transmission.

Significant delays in West Nile virus reporting

Significant delays in West Nile virus reporting

Mount Sinai researchers found significant delays in reporting human cases of West Nile virus, hampering real-time forecasting of the potentially deadly mosquito-borne disease, according to a study in the JAMA Network Open in April.

Newly discovered Ebolavirus may not cause severe disease in humans

Newly discovered Ebolavirus may not cause severe disease in humans

Their findings showed that certain positions in the VP24 protein of the Bombali virus are identical to the Reston virus, another member of the Ebolavirus family that is not pathogenic in humans.

Eating elderberries can help minimize influenza symptoms

Eating elderberries can help minimize influenza symptoms

Conducted by Professor Fariba Deghani, Dr Golnoosh Torabian and Dr Peter Valtchev as part of the ARC Training Centre for the Australian Food Processing Industry that was established within the university's Faculty of Engineering and IT, the study showed that compounds from elderberries can directly inhibit the virus's entry and replication in human cells, and can help strengthen a person's immune response to the virus.

Proofreading the book of life: Gene editing made safer

Proofreading the book of life: Gene editing made safer

Clever researchers soon recognized the potential of CRISPR-Cas9 to serve as an all-purpose gene editing tool, useful not only for modifying selected regions throughout the entire bacterial genome, but the genomes of all living organisms, including humans.

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